3. Read Aloud – Wolf 2nd

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Read Aloud – Wolf 2nd

Grade Level: Second Grade

School: McKinley Elementary School

Location: Tacoma, Washington

Materials: Wolf! By Becky Bloom

Videographer: Dima Yaremenko

Elapsed Time: 14:16

Introduction: In the primary grades, we often read books to children not just to entertain or to fill a period of time, but to increase students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills and to introduce students to specific genre, authors, and/or information.  When read-alouds are systematically used as a part of our literacy program, a number of evidence-based procedures should be incorporated to maximize benefits.

Focus: As you watch this video,

1)    Identify practices that are used to support students’ understanding of novel vocabulary words.

2)    Identify procedures that were used to support students’ comprehension of the book.

3)    Note other instructional procedures that were beneficial.

Feedback:

1) Identify practices that are used to support students’ understanding of novel vocabulary words.

a)    Brief explanations of novel words were embedded into the read-aloud without interrupting the flow of the story.

b) The teacher pointed to the illustrations to support vocabulary.

c) The teacher added gestures (e.g., peering) to augment vocabulary.

2) Identify procedures that were used to support students’ comprehension of the book.
The following research-validated practices were used:

a)    An engaging book was chosen.

b) Performance-based reading was utilized.

c) Questions were asked to verify understanding, to focus students’ attention on critical information, and to increase on-task behavior.

d) Students were actively engaged in the reading of the book.

3) Note other instructional procedures that were beneficial.
Some practices that might have been noticed:

a)    The pace was “perky” though not frenetic.

b)    The teacher connected to the students.

c)    The classroom climate was positive.

d)    The teacher elicited responses from students including:

–       group responses (choral responses)

–       partner responses

–       partner responses followed by individual turns

–       thumbs up

e)  When a student did not have a response, the teacher did not leave the student but rather provided “scaffolding” so that the student could be successful.  In this case, the teacher told the student an answer.

NOTE: The video entitled Vocabulary Instruction – 2nd highlights the same group of students as seen in this video.  In the second video, the students are taught critical vocabulary terms from the read-aloud book.

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